Muslim Brotherhood: The Arab Trojan Horse

The CIA-MI6-Mossad Brotherhood Trick Egypt With Muslim Trojan Horse

“The West’s ability to install a Muslim Brotherhood government in Egypt, with it’s substantial regional standing and influence would be a serious blow not only to Syria, but to Iran as well.

The Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt is already echoing calls by the US and Israel for “intervention” in Syria.” – Tony Cartalucci,“US Struggles to Install Proxy “Brotherhood” in Egypt.”

“The USA has got its candidate into power in Egypt.” – Aangirfan, “USA Takes Over Egypt.”

Stuxnet and Flame are not the only viruses that have been created by the U.S. and Israeli intelligence agencies. The Muslim Brotherhood is perhaps Washington’s most successful and dangerous virus that it has injected into the veins of the Middle East. It is an intellectual virus that destroys critical thinking among Muslims, excites their animal passions, and makes them act against their own interests.

With this virus firmly embedded in Egypt’s social and political life, Washington has guaranteed its position in the region for years to come. But by no means does the Muslim Brotherhood have anything close to a majority of popular support in Egypt. Since half the country didn’t vote in the election, the new president Mohammed Morsi only has the backing of “26% of the full electorate.”

Whatever course Morsi decides to take Egypt in the coming months, it is already clear that his government will resemble a gang even more than the one currently in power. The only difference is that Washington wanted the Muslim Brotherhood on top in Egypt, so it won.

What does Morsi’s win in Egypt mean for relations between the Western world and the Islamic world? I don’t know. But say goodbye to the Arab Spring, and say hello to the Islamist Summer. Washington’s Muslim Brotherhood is the new face of Egypt. In the past year, similar radical Islamist groups have taken over in Libya and Tunisia as the result of illegal Western interventions.

Well played, Washington, London, and Tel Aviv. Now you have your war against Islam. Now you can point at the bad guys, the rising Islamists, and tell your populations to hate and fear.

The Arab Trojan Horse

The Arab Spring has changed the political scene in the Middle East. Most striking is the re-touching of the image of a radical organisation such as the Muslim Brotherhood to that of a potential “civil” form for future governance in the region. One might argue: “As other ideologies have not achieved well-being for Arabs, why don’t we try Islamism?” When it comes to Syria, the Egyptian presidential election and the Muslim Brotherhood’s rise within the “Egyptian Spring” have enforced such arguments, especially given the general public’s disappointment with the Ba’ath party’s socialist policies.

However, before any judgment can be made, a few points related to both the general history of the Brotherhood and its history within Syria must be reviewed. The Muslim Brotherhood was founded in 1928 by Hasan al-Banna, a fundamentalist Egyptian schoolteacher who advocated violent jihad and the replacement of secular governments with a worldwide totalitarian caliphate governed under strict Islamic sharia law. By the 1940s, branches of the Brotherhood had been established across the Arab world; during this period, the Syrian branch was considered second only to Egypt’s in size.

The Muslim Brotherhood is known for its supposed hostility to US policies and Israel. What is not well-known is that the spread of the movement in Arab countries was facilitated by the CIA during the Cold War era as part of the famous “strategy of containment”, the anti-Soviet, anti-communist initiative adopted by Eisenhower’s administration which lasted until the late eighties. Over these decades, the Muslim Brotherhood turned into a “Trojan horse” within countries allied with the Soviet Union.

This is not a “conspiracy theory”. Rather, recall the July 1953 photo of Eisenhower with the Princeton Islam Seminar delegation at the White House: Said Ramadan, Banna’s son-in-law and then the most distinguished figure within the Brotherhood’s hierarchy, is standing second from the right.

Now, however, although the Brotherhood’s success in Egypt may have revived its dream of becoming a ‘regional governance system’, differences among its branches make that a long shot in practice. In Egypt, besides its failed assassination attempt on president Gamal Abdel Nasser and its successful assassination of his successor Anwar al-Sadat for signing a peace treaty with Israel, the Muslim Brotherhood has conducted more peaceful activities, focusing on educational systems and charity organisations and publically confronting the mainstream political system by providing local financial aid that attracted candidates. However, their story in Syria was entirely different.

The organisation entered Syria in 1936 thanks to Mustafa al-Siba’i, a pupil of Banna, who returned from Cairo after studying at Al-Azhar Mosque. The major shift took place in 1973, when the Vanguard Fighters, the Brotherhood’s armed wing, was established to change the Ba’athist secular government by force of arms and establish an Islamic state in Syria. A violent rebellion conducted in Syria during the late 1970s and into the 1980s left bloody memories of doctors, academics, and army officers assassinated by Muslim Brothers, along with the massacres they carried out against civilians in Damascus, Aleppo, Homs and Hama.

Such memories make this organisation much less appealing for Syrians, especially since fundamentalists represent only 1 percent of Syrian Muslims, while the majority of them are either conservatives or moderates and oppose the violent conduct of the Brotherhood, according to a 2006 document from the US Embassy in Syria published by Wikileaks.  Currently, the Muslim Brotherhood has managed to benefit from the Egyptian Spring, although it is too early to say it has succeeded in taking over the country’s political system. But in Syria, the situation does not seem promising for the Brotherhood or its allies.

U.S. nears deal for $1 billion in Egypt debt relief

The Obama administration is close to a deal with Egypt’s new government for $1 billion in debt relief, a senior U.S. official said on Monday, as Washington seeks to help Cairo shore up its ailing economy in the aftermath of its pro-democracy uprising.

U.S. diplomats and negotiators for Egypt’s new Islamist president Mohamed Mursi – who took office in June after the country’s first free elections – were working to finalize an agreement, the official said.

Progress on the aid package, which had languished during Egypt’s 18 months of political turmoil, appears to reflect a cautious easing of U.S. suspicions about Mursi and a desire to show economic goodwill to help keep the longstanding U.S.-Egyptian partnership from deteriorating further.

The United States was a close ally of Egypt under ousted autocratic President Hosni Mubarak and gives $1.3 billion in military aid a year to Egypt plus other assistance.

But even as the negotiations proceeded in Cairo, Washington has also signaled its backing for a $4.8 billion loan that Egypt is seeking from the International Monetary Fund and which it hopes to secure by the end of the year to bolster its stricken economy. IMF chief Christine Lagarde visited Cairo last month to discuss the matter.

Egypt’s military-appointed interim government had been negotiating a $3.2 billion package before it handed power to Mursi on June 30. Mursi’s government then increased the request.

Lagarde said the IMF would look at fiscal, monetary and structural issues, promising that the IMF would be a partner in “an Egyptian journey” of economic reform.

 

Related Articles:

Nazis, Muslim Brotherhood and the Plan for World War 3